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See also: mendigó

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mendigo.

NounEdit

mendigo (plural mendigos)

  1. A beggar.
    • 1887, Fanny Chambers Gooch Iglehart, “chapter IX”, in Face to Face with the Mexicans:
      Sitting complacently upon a broken, fallen column, we beheld an object that filled us with horror—an Indian mendigo, a representation in one, of the ancient Aztec, the pobre Mexicano, and the gentleman of the nineteenth century.

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mendigo, from Latin mendīcus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /mẽ.ˈdi.ɣu/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /mẽ.ˈd͡ʒi.ɡu/
    • (colloquial) IPA(key): /mĩ.ˈd͡ʒi.ɡu/
    • (very colloquial) IPA(key): /mĩ.ˈd͡ʒĩ.ɡu/
  • Hyphenation: men‧di‧go

NounEdit

mendigo m (plural mendigos, feminine mendiga, feminine plural mendigas)

  1. beggar (person who begs for a living)
    Synonym: pedinte

VerbEdit

mendigo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of mendigar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mendīcus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mendigo m (plural mendigos, feminine mendiga, feminine plural mendigas)

  1. beggar (person who begs for a living)
    Synonym: limosnero

VerbEdit

mendigo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of mendigar.