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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mignard, akin to mignon. See minion.

AdjectiveEdit

migniard (comparative more migniard, superlative most migniard)

  1. (obsolete) soft; dainty
    "I swear by my eternal salvation and by the holy Evangelists here present under my hand, to hold the woman suspected of being a demon to be an angel, a perfect woman, and even more so in mind than in body, living in all honesty, full of the migniard charms and delights of love, in no way wicked, but most generous, assisting greatly the poor and suffering." - Honoré de Balzac, "The Succubus", excerpted from Droll Stories (tr. 1907)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for migniard in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit