See also: Mignon

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mignon, from Middle French mignon(lover, darling, favourite), from Old French mignon(dainty, pleasing, gentle, kind), from Frankish *minnjo(love, friendship, affection, memory), from Proto-Germanic *minþijō, *mindijō(affectionate thought, care), from Proto-Indo-European *men-, *mnā-(to think). Cognate with Old High German minnja(love, care, affection, desire, memory), Old Saxon minnea(love). More at mind. Compare also minion and Dutch minnen(to love).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mignon ‎(comparative more mignon, superlative most mignon)

  1. Small and cute; pretty in a delicate way; dainty.
    • 1867, Ouida, Under Two Flags: A Story of the Household and the Desert, Volume II, Chapman and Hall (1867), page 194:
      It was the deep-blue, dreaming, haughty eyes of "Miladi" that he was bringing back to memory, not the brown mignon face that had been so late close to his in the light of the moon.
    • 1867, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Ishmael, John and Robert Maxwell (1867), page 119:
      Or failing that, it must be sweet to be a famous beauty, a golden-haired divinity, like that fashionable enchantress whom she had seen often on the boulevards and in the Champs-Elysées—a mignon face, a figure delicate to fragility, almost buried amidst the luxury of a matchless set of sables, seated in the lightest and most elegant of victorias, behind a pair of thoroughbred blacks.
    • 1899, Paul Leicester Ford, Janice Meredith: A Story of the American Revolution, Volume 1, Dodd, Mead & Company (1899), page 64:
      What she looked at was an unset miniature of a young girl, with a wealth of darkest brown hair, powdered to a gray, and a little straight nose with just a suggestion of a tilt to it, giving the mignon face an expression of pride that the rest of the countenance by no means aided.
    • 1911, Marcin Barner, "Britz of Headquarters", The Branford Opinion, 29 September 1911:
      Exactly what my grandfather says," Dorothy retorted, fun flashing in that mignon face.
    • 1987, Persistence of Vision: The Journal of the Film Faculty of the City University of New York, Issues 5-8, page 68:
      Starting a dance can be as fortuitous as its termination: a very short, mignon girl asks a tall guy to dance with her, then drops him a moment later without a word.
    • 2002, Seçil Büker, "The Film Does not End with an Ecstatic Kiss", in Fragments of Culture: The Everyday of Modern Turkey (eds. Deniz Kandiyoti & Ayşe Saktanber), Rutgers University Press (2002), ISBN 0813530814, page 161:
      Magazines dubbed her 'a girl for the salons', 'the pretty girl' of the Turkish cinema, perfectly suited to the role of a blonde, mignon girl who had been educated at the best schools. In later years she herself would say, 'I was cute and sweet, but unable to project the image of a sexy woman, []

NounEdit

mignon ‎(plural mignons)

  1. (French history) One of the court favourites of Henry III.
    • 2003, Louis Crompton, Homosexuality and Civilization, Harvard 2003, p. 330:
      When the mignons, barefoot and clad in sacks with holes for their heads and feet, marched with Henry in a penitential procession, lashing their backs, one wit opined that they should have aimed their blows lower.
    • 2005, Rebecca Zorach, Blood, Milk, Ink, Gold, University of Chicago 2005, p. 220:
      Many commentators claimed hyperbolically that, because of their outrageous fashions, it was difficult to tell whether the mignons were male or female.
  2. (rare) A cute person; a pretty child.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French mignon, from Old French mignon(dainty, pleasing, gentle, kind), from Frankish *minnjo(love, friendship, affection, memory), from Proto-Germanic *minþijō, *mindijō(affectionate thought, care), from Proto-Indo-European *men-, *mnā-(to think). Cognate with Old High German minnja(love, care, affection, desire, memory), Old Saxon minnea(love). More at mind.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mignon m ‎(feminine singular mignonne, masculine plural mignons, feminine plural mignonnes)

  1. cute (of a baby, an animal, etc.)
  2. cute (sexually attractive)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

mignon m ‎(plural mignons)

  1. a small pastry

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

French

AdjectiveEdit

mignon ‎(invariable)

  1. mignon (small and dainty)

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

French

NounEdit

  1. filet mignon

AdjectiveEdit

mignon ‎(plural, comparable)

  1. mignon (small and dainty)
  2. (slang) cute (sexually attractive)

External linksEdit

  • "mignon" in Michaelis On-Line Dicionário Brasileiro da Língua Portuguesa (Michaelis Portuguese Language Brazilian Online Dictionary)