EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin minium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

minium (usually uncountable, plural miniums)

  1. (now historical) Cinnabar, especially when used as a pigment; vermilion. [from 14th c.]
  2. Red lead. [from 17th c.]
    • 1861, Robert H. Lamborn, A rudimentary treatise on the Metallurgy of Silver and Lead (page 43)
      The compounds formed by the combination of the peroxide of lead with the protoxide have received the general name of miniums, and are known in commerce as red lead.
    • 2007, Nancy L. Canepa, translating Giambattista Basile, Tale of Tales, Penguin 2007, p. 29:
      [H]e was so overcome by suffering that his face, which had once been of oriental minium, now became like orpiment, and the hams of his lips turned into rancid lard.

TranslationsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

minium n

  1. red lead, minium (a bright red, poisonous oxide of lead, Pb3O4, used as a pigment and in glass and ceramics)

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin minium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

minium m (uncountable)

  1. red lead

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Iberian.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

minium n (genitive miniī or minī); second declension

  1. native cinnabar
  2. red lead, minium

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative minium minia
Genitive miniī
minī1
miniōrum
Dative miniō miniīs
Accusative minium minia
Ablative miniō miniīs
Vocative minium minia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • minium”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • minium”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • minium in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • minium in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette