FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mihswǭ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mysa f (genitive singular mysu, uncountable)

  1. whey

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mysa (singular only)
f1s singular
indefinite definite
nominative mysa mysan
accusative mysu mysuna
dative mysu mysuni
genitive mysu mysunnar

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mihswǭ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mysa f (genitive singular mysu, no plural)

  1. whey

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since 1640. From Danish myse (squint) and Norwegian myse (squint), ultimately related to Greek μύειν (mýein, to close ones lips/eyes) and μυωπία (myopía, near-sightedness; myopia) and English myopic. Compare Swedish mystisk (mysterious) and myssla (to whistle; to squeak, archaic, dialectal).[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mysa (present myser, preterite myste or mös, supine myst, imperative mys)

  1. To be engaged in an activity that is comfortable or pleasurable.
    Katten ligger och myser i solen.
    The cat is lying in the sun, feeling cozy.
  2. To be comfortable or content with something.
  3. (archaic) To smile (with only slight movement of the mouth), particularly as a sign of contentedness or comfort.
    • c. 1670, anonymous, Bröllops Beswär, 177
      (Då) Handtags i hwar oc en wrå, med mysande liuszögde systrar.
      [And thus] hands are shaken in every corner, with contentedly smiling sisters.
    • 1835, diaries of Zacharias Topelius, diaries, 2:100
      Sophie Olsson myste på mund, tyckte visst om sig i sin svarta domino.
      Sophie Olsson smiled contentedly and quite liked herself in her black domino.

ConjugationEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit