English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle English whey, wheye, whei, from Old English hwǣġ, hwæiġ, hwæġ, hweġ (whey), from Proto-West Germanic *hwaij (whey) (compare Saterland Frisian Waai, Woaie, West Frisian waai, Dutch wei, Low German Wei, German Low German Wei), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *kʷey- (to pile up, build) (compare Old Church Slavonic чинъ (činŭ, order), Ancient Greek ποιέω (poiéō, to pile up, make), Sanskrit कय (káya, every one)).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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whey (usually uncountable, plural wheys)

  1. The liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained in the process of making cheese.
    • 1805, Songs for the Nursery, page 23:
      Little Miss Muffet, She sat on a tuffet, Eating of curds and whey; There came a little spider, Who sat down beside her, And frighted Miss Muffet away.
    • 1847, Emily Brontë, chapter XX, in Wuthering Heights[1]:
      {...} if I wished any blessing in the world, it was to find him a worthy object of pride; and I’m bitterly disappointed with the whey-faced, whining wretch!

Coordinate terms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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See also

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Middle English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old English hwǣġ, hwæiġ, hwæġ, hweġ, from Proto-West Germanic *hwaij (whey).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /hwæi̯/
  • (dialectal) IPA(key): /wæi̯/, /xwæi̯/

Noun

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whey (uncountable)

  1. The leftovers from milk curdled during cheesemaking; whey.
  2. (rare) The result of strained almond milk.

Descendants

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  • English: whey (whig)
  • Scots: quhaye, quhay, quhey, whey, fey

References

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