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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English narwenesse; equivalent to narrow +‎ -ness.

NounEdit

narrowness (countable and uncountable, plural narrownesses)

  1. (uncountable) the state of being narrow
    • 1749, [John Cleland], Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure [Fanny Hill], London: Printed [by Thomas Parker] for G. Fenton [i.e., Fenton and Ralph Griffiths] [], OCLC 731622352:
      presently, then, I felt the stiff insertion between the yielding, divided lips of the wound, now open for life; where the narrowness no longer put me to intolerable pain, and afforded my lover no more difficulty than what heighten'd his pleasure, in the strict embrace of that tender, warm sheath, round the instrument it was so delicately adjusted to
  2. (countable) a constriction

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit