See also: nëch and nēch-

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

nech

  1. second-person singular imperative of nechat

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *nekʷos (someone, something); compare nach (some, any). Cognate with Welsh neb.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

nech

  1. someone, anyone, (after a negative particle) no one
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 55d11
      Amal du·berad nech hi ceist do Dauid: “Húare is móir sléb fírinne Dǽ, cid ara fodmai-siu, ⟨a⟩ Dauid, didiu a ndu imnedaib ⁊ frithoircnib fodaimi? Air it fírián-⟨s⟩u.” Ícaid-som didiu anísin, a n-as·mbeir iudicia Domini abisus multa .i. ataat mesai Dǽ nephchomtetarrachti amal abis ⁊ amal fudumain. Is ed in sin fod·era in n-erígim, cid ara fodaim int aís fírián inna fochaidi, ⁊ cid ara mbiat in pecthaig isnaib soinmechaib.
      As though someone had put as a question to David: “Because God’s righteousness is as great as a mountain, why then, David, dost thou suffer what of afflictions and injuries thou sufferest? For thou art righteous.” He solves that then when he says “iudicia Domini abyssus multa”, i.e. there are judgments of God incomprehensible like an abyss and like a depth. That is what causes the complaint why the righteous folk endure tribulations, and why sinners are in prosperity.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 114b18
      nád fil nech con·gné fris ón acht Día
      that there is no one to help him but God

InflectionEdit

Case Animate Neuter
Nominative nech
Accusative nech
Genitive neich
Dative neuch, neoch

Further readingEdit