Alternative formsEdit


From ochre +‎ -ous.



ochrous ‎(comparative more ochrous, superlative most ochrous)

  1. Containing ochre.
    • 1958, Henno Martin, The Sheltering Desert, translated by Edward Fitzgerald, Thomas Nelson & Sons, p. 17,
      Ahead of us was a great ochreous depression over which a shifting heat haze trembled looking almost like blue smoke.
  2. Ochre-coloured; brownish-yellow.
    • 1886, Thomas Hardy, The Mayor of Casterbridge, Chapter I, [1]
      [] they looked around for a refreshment tent among the many which dotted the down. Two, which stood nearest to them in the ochreous haze of expiring sunlight, seemed almost equally inviting.
    • 1949, Henry Miller, The Rosy Crucifixion, Book One: Sexus, New York: Grove Press, 1965, Chapter 23, p. 498, [2]
      The Lutheran Church across the way, which in the daylight was the color of baby shit, had now taken on a soft ochrous hue which blended serenely with the black of the asphalt.
    • 1967, William Styron, The Confessions of Nat Turner, Vintage 2004, p. 179:
      It was a Saturday, one of those dusty, ocherous autumnal days whose vivid weather never again seems so sweet and inviting after that youthful time of discovery [...].