Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin;[1] possibly from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewt(i)o- ‎(forlorn, deserted), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew(e)- ‎(down, away, from). Because the word was sometimes used to describe emptiness, a gesture of peace or pact instead of pax, it has been compared to similar words in other Indo-European languages such as Old Norse auðr ‎(emptiness, void), Gothic 𐌰𐌿𐍀𐌴𐌹𐍃 ‎(empty), and Ancient Greek ακριοσ ‎(empty), with a gesture such as a handshake signaling inactivity and emptiness.[2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōtium n ‎(genitive ōtiī); second declension

  1. time free from activity: leisure
  2. time avoiding activity: idleness, inactivity
  3. peace, quiet

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ōtium ōtia
genitive ōtiī ōtiōrum
dative ōtiō ōtiīs
accusative ōtium ōtia
ablative ōtiō ōtiīs
vocative ōtium ōtia


  1. Note: Occasionally gen. s. is written oti.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • otium in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • otium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • otium in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be at leisure: otium habere
    • to be a lover of ease, leisure: otium sequi, amplexari
    • (ambiguous) to use up, make full use of one's spare time: otio abūti or otium ad suum usum transferre
    • to retire into private life: in otium se referre (Fam. 99)
    • (ambiguous) to be at leisure: in otio esse or vivere
    • (ambiguous) to be at leisure: otio frui
    • (ambiguous) to have abundance of leisure: otio abundare
    • (ambiguous) to use up, make full use of one's spare time: otio abūti or otium ad suum usum transferre
    • (ambiguous) to grow slack with inactivity, stagnate: (in) otio languere et hebescere
    • (ambiguous) to grow slack with inactivity, stagnate: otio diffluere
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill
  2. ^ Giorgio Agamben, Idea of Prose, p. 81
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