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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin;[1] possibly from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewt(i)o- (forlorn, deserted), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew(e)- (down, away, from). Because the word was sometimes used to describe emptiness, a gesture of peace or pact instead of pax, it has been compared to similar words in other Indo-European languages such as Old Norse auðr (emptiness, void), Gothic 𐌰𐌿𐍀𐌴𐌹𐍃 (aupeis, empty), and Ancient Greek ακριός (akriós, empty), with a gesture such as a handshake signaling inactivity and emptiness.[2] Also Ancient Greek ἐτός (etós, without reason).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōtium n (genitive ōtiī); second declension

  1. time free from activity: leisure
  2. time avoiding activity: idleness, inactivity
  3. peace, quiet

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ōtium ōtia
genitive ōtiī ōtiōrum
dative ōtiō ōtiīs
accusative ōtium ōtia
ablative ōtiō ōtiīs
vocative ōtium ōtia

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • otium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • otium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • otium” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be at leisure: otium habere
    • to be a lover of ease, leisure: otium sequi, amplexari
    • (ambiguous) to use up, make full use of one's spare time: otio abūti or otium ad suum usum transferre
    • to retire into private life: in otium se referre (Fam. 99)
    • (ambiguous) to be at leisure: in otio esse or vivere
    • (ambiguous) to be at leisure: otio frui
    • (ambiguous) to have abundance of leisure: otio abundare
    • (ambiguous) to use up, make full use of one's spare time: otio abūti or otium ad suum usum transferre
    • (ambiguous) to grow slack with inactivity, stagnate: (in) otio languere et hebescere
    • (ambiguous) to grow slack with inactivity, stagnate: otio diffluere
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill
  2. ^ Giorgio Agamben, Idea of Prose, p. 81