FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *outo. Cognate with Estonian õud/õudne, Karelian outo.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈou̯to/, [ˈo̞u̯t̪o̞]
  • Rhymes: -outo
  • Syllabification(key): ou‧to

AdjectiveEdit

outo (comparative oudompi, superlative oudoin)

  1. strange, weird

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of outo (Kotus type 1*F/valo, t-d gradation)
nominative outo oudot
genitive oudon outojen
partitive outoa outoja
illative outoon outoihin
singular plural
nominative outo oudot
accusative nom. outo oudot
gen. oudon
genitive oudon outojen
partitive outoa outoja
inessive oudossa oudoissa
elative oudosta oudoista
illative outoon outoihin
adessive oudolla oudoilla
ablative oudolta oudoilta
allative oudolle oudoille
essive outona outoina
translative oudoksi oudoiksi
instructive oudoin
abessive oudotta oudoitta
comitative outoine
Possessive forms of outo (type valo)
Rare. Only used with substantive adjectives.
possessor singular plural
1st person outoni outomme
2nd person outosi outonne
3rd person outonsa

Derived termsEdit

CompoundsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • → Sami:

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese outo, only documented in place names, from Latin altus; replaced already during the Middle Ages by alto, probably a learned form. Cognate of Old Spanish oto which was also preserved in toponyms and in a few derived words as otear (to watch from a high place).[1]

AdjectiveEdit

outo m (feminine singular outa, masculine plural outos, feminine plural outas)

  1. (archaic) high, tall

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • outo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  1. ^ Joan Coromines; José A. Pascual (1983–1991), “alto I”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos