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See also: Tall, tal, Tal, tál, tâl, tål, -tal, -tál, tala, taal, and Taal

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English tall, talle, tal (seemly, becoming, handsome, good-looking, excellent, good, valiant, lively in speech, bold, great, large, big), from Old English *tæl, ġetæl (swift, ready, having mastery of), from Proto-Germanic *talaz (submissive, pliable, obedient), from Proto-Indo-European *dol-, *del- (to aim, calculate, adjust, reckon). Cognate with Scots tal (high, lofty, tall), Old Frisian tel (swift), Old Saxon gital (quick), Old High German gizal (active, agile), Gothic 𐌿𐌽𐍄𐌰𐌻𐍃 (untals, indocile, disobedient).

The Oxford English Dictionary notes: "The sense development [of tall] is remarkable, but is paralleled more or less by that of other adjectives expressing estimation, such as buxom, canny, clean, clever, cunning, deft, elegant, handsome, pretty, proper; German klein, as compared with English clean, presents the antithesis to modern tall as compared to tall in early Middle English. It has been conjectured that in the sense 'high of stature' it is a different word, adopted from the Welsh tal in some sense; but the latter is, according to Professor Rhŷs, merely a 16th-century borrowing of the English word (in Owen Pughe's Dictionary erroneously mixed up with the genuine Welsh word tal (end, brow, forehead), with which it has no possible connection.)"[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tall (comparative taller, superlative tallest)

  1. (of a person) Having a vertical extent greater than the average. For example, somebody with a height of over 6 feet would generally be considered to be tall.
    Being tall is an advantage in basketball.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps, [] , and the light of the reflector fell full upon her.
  2. (of a building, etc.) Having its top a long way up; having a great vertical (and often greater than horizontal) extent; high.
  3. (of a story) Hard to believe, such as a tall story or a tall tale.
  4. (chiefly US, of a cup of coffee) A cup of coffee smaller than grande, usually 8 ounces.
  5. (obsolete) Obsequious; obedient.
  6. (obsolete) Seemly; suitable; fitting, becoming, comely; attractive, handsome.
  7. (obsolete) Bold; brave; courageous; valiant.
  8. (archaic) Fine; proper; admirable; great; excellent.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

tall (plural talls)

  1. (possibly nonstandard) Someone or something that is tall.
    • 1912, George Francis Atkinson, Botany for High Schools, Henry Holt and Company:
      But in the second generation of hybrids (from seed of the first) talls and dwarfs were both present, and in the proportion of twelve talls to four dwarfs.
    • 2009, Arianne Cohen, The Tall Book: A Celebration of Life from on High, page 197:
      The industries that best accommodate talls are those that have faced personal injury lawsuits.
    • 2018 June 5, Chris Robinson, “Fremantle Dockers defender Alex Pearce faces fitness test on injured ankle”, in The West Australian[1]:
      Fremantle remains unsure about the status a pair of key talls ahead of a defining clash with Adelaide at Optus Stadium.

ReferencesEdit

  • tall at OneLook Dictionary Search

AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *talna, related to Lithuanian tylù (to become silent), Old Irish tuilid (to sleep), Proto-Slavic *toliti (to persuade, to make quiet)[2].

VerbEdit

tall (first-person singular past tense talla, participle tallur)

  1. to laugh at
  2. to mock

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary T, p. 57.
  2. ^ A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, V.Orel, Koninklijke Brill ,Leiden 2000, p.448

BretonEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tall

  1. Hard mutation of dall.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin talea.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tall m (plural talls)

  1. cut

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

tall (genitive talle, partitive talle)

  1. lamb

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse tal.

NounEdit

tall n (definite singular tallet, indefinite plural tall, definite plural talla or tallene)

  1. number, numeral, figure

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

AdverbEdit

tall

  1. there
    Is bec ndi dechur fil etarru siu ⁊ tall.There is little difference between them here and there.
  2. then
    amal du·ratsat sacaird tall bendachta forsin populas the priests had blessed the people then

DescendantsEdit

DeterminerEdit

tall

  1. that (used after the noun, which is preceded by the definite article)
    a tadall tallthat visit

SynonymsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tall c

  1. pine, Scots pine tree, Pinus sylvestris

DeclensionEdit

Declension of tall 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tall tallen tallar tallarna
Genitive talls tallens tallars tallarnas

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit