EnglishEdit

NounEdit

pelve (plural pelves)

  1. (anatomy) Synonym of pelvis
    • 1887, Ernst Ziegler, Sir Donald MacAlister, A Text-book of Pathological Anatomy and Pathogenesis:
      Calcium phosphate may form gravel and small calculi in the pelve of the kidney; the calculi are smooth and facetted, and of various de grees of hardness.
    • 1947, Gynaecologia - Volumes 123-124, page 59:
      The pregnancy had reached term. The fetal head was plunged in the pelve for a greater part; the back was found in the left part of the womans abdomen; heart-beats were not heard.
    • 2003, Kathy Reichs, Bare Bones, →ISBN:
      The pubis was often chopped off from the pelve at Wardell (Pl. 7e, f), a method which was rarely used at Glenrock. The reason is unclear, although it may have been done to break the connection between the pelves at the pubis symphysis.
    • 2018, Gloria H. Giroux, Crucifixion Thorn: Volume Two of the Arizona Trilogy, →ISBN:
      The pelve is wider, and so is its pelvic inlet bone.

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin pelvis (bowl).

NounEdit

pelve f (plural pelves)

  1. pelvis

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

pelve (plural pelves)

  1. pelvis

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

pelve

  1. ablative singular of pelvis

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin pelvis (bowl), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (container)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pelve f (plural pelves)

  1. (anatomy) pelvis
    Synonym: bacia (colloquial)

MeronymsEdit

Related termsEdit