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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Ancient Greek φυσική (phusikḗ), feminine singular of φυσικός (phusikós).

NounEdit

physica f (genitive physicae); first declension

  1. physics

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative physica physicae
genitive physicae physicārum
dative physicae physicīs
accusative physicam physicās
ablative physicā physicīs
vocative physica physicae

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

physica

  1. nominative feminine singular of physicus
  2. nominative neuter plural of physicus
  3. accusative neuter plural of physicus
  4. vocative feminine singular of physicus
  5. vocative neuter plural of physicus

physicā

  1. ablative feminine singular of physicus

ReferencesEdit

  • physica in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • physica in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “physica”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • physica” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) physics; natural philosophy: physica (-orum) (Or. 34. 119); philosophia naturalis

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

physica f (plural physicas)

  1. Obsolete spelling of física (used in Portugal until September 1911 and died out in Brazil during the 1920s).

AdjectiveEdit

physica f sg

  1. Obsolete spelling of física (used in Portugal until September 1911 and died out in Brazil during the 1920s).