English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English natural, borrowed from Old French natural, naturel, from Latin nātūrālis, from nātus, the perfect participle of nāscor (be born, verb). Displaced native Old English ġecynde.

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: năchʹ(ə)rəl, IPA(key): /ˈnæt͡ʃ(ə)ɹəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætʃəɹəl, -ætʃɹəl
  • Hyphenation: nat‧u‧ral, natu‧ral

Adjective edit

natural (comparative more natural, superlative most natural)

  1. Existing in nature.
    1. Existing in the nature of a person or thing; innate, not acquired or learned. [from 14th c.]
      • 1726 October 28, [Jonathan Swift], Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. [] [Gulliver’s Travels], London: [] Benj[amin] Motte, [], →OCLC, (please specify |part=I to IV):
        The natural Love of Life gave me some inward Motions of Joy.
      • 1858, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter VII, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume II, Longman et al., page 419:
        With strong natural sense, and rare force of will, he found himself, when first his mind began to open, a fatherless and motherless child, the chief of a great but depressed and disheartened party, and the heir to vast and indefinite pretensions, which excited the dread and aversion of the oligarchy then supreme in the United Provinces.
      • 2019 July 10, The Guardian[1]:
        A South African Uber driver is causing excitement with his impressive operatic singing but, however much natural talent you have, it is a long road to La Scala.
    2. Normally associated with a particular person or thing; inherently related to the nature of a thing or creature. [from 14th c.]
      The species will be under threat if its natural habitat is destroyed.
    3. As expected; reasonable, normal; naturally arising from the given circumstances. [from 14th c.]
      It's natural for business to be slow on Tuesdays.
      His prison sentence was the natural consequence of a life of crime.
      • 1711 May 25, Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, The Spectator, volume I, number 74, page 333:
        What can be more natural or more moving than the circumſtances in which he deſcribes the behaviour of thoſe women who had loſt their huſbands on this fatal day ?
    4. Formed by nature; not manufactured or created by artificial processes. [from 15th c.]
    5. Pertaining to death brought about by disease or old age, rather than by violence, accident etc. [from 16th c.]
      She died of natural causes.
      • 2015 June 5, The Guardian[2]:
        Cancer patient David Paterson, 81, was close to a natural death when he was suffocated by Heather Davidson, 54, in the bedroom of his care home in North Yorkshire on 11 February.
    6. Having an innate ability to fill a given role or profession, or display a specified character. [from 16th c.]
    7. (mathematics)
      1. Designating a standard trigonometric function of an angle, as opposed to the logarithmic function. [from 17th c.]
      2. (algebra) Closed under submodules, direct sums, and injective hulls.
    8. (music) Neither sharp nor flat. Denoted . [from 18th c.]
      There's a wrong note here: it should be C natural instead of C sharp.
    9. Containing no artificial or man-made additives; especially (of food) containing no colourings, flavourings or preservatives. [from 19th c.]
      Natural food is healthier than processed food.
    10. Pertaining to a decoration that preserves or enhances the appearance of the original material; not stained or artificially coloured. [from 19th c.]
    11. Pertaining to a fabric still in its undyed state, or to the colour of undyed fabric. [from 19th c.]
    12. (dice games) Pertaining to a dice roll before bonuses or penalties have been applied to the result.
    13. (bodybuilding) Not having used anabolic steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs.
      Antonym: enhanced
    14. (bridge) Bidding in an intuitive way that reflects one's actual hand.
      Antonyms: artificial, conventional
  2. Pertaining to birth or descent; native.
    1. Having a given status (especially of authority) by virtue of birth. [14th–19th c.]
    2. Related genetically but not legally to one's father; born out of wedlock, illegitimate. [from 15th c.]
      • 1790, Jane Austen, “Love and Freindship”, in Juvenilia:
        [M]y Mother was the natural Daughter of a Scotch Peer by an italian Opera-girl [] .
      • 1872, George Eliot, Middlemarch, Book III, chapter 26:
        Mrs Taft [] had got it into her head that Mr Lydgate was a natural son of Bulstrode's, a fact which seemed to justify her suspicions of evangelical laymen.
      • 1990, Roy Porter, English Society in the 18th Century, Penguin, published 1991, page 264:
        Dr Erasmus Darwin set up his two illegitimate daughters as the governesses of a school, noting that natural children often had happier (because less pretentious) upbringings than legitimate.
    3. Related by birth; genetically related. [from 16th c.]
      • 1843, John Henry Newman, “The Kingdom of the Saints”, in Parochial Sermons, 4th edition, volume II, J. G. F. & J. Rivington, pages 264–5:
        The first-born in every house, “from the first-born of the Pharaoh on the throne, to the first-born of the captive in the dungeon,” unaccountably found himself enlisted in the ranks of this new power, and estranged from his natural friends.

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun edit

natural (plural naturals)

  1. (now rare) A native inhabitant of a place, country etc. [from 16th c.]
    • 1615, Ralph Hamor, A True Discourse of the Present State of Virginia, Richmond, published 1957, page 3:
      I coniecture and assure my selfe that yee cannot be ignorant by what meanes this peace hath bin thus happily both for our proceedings and the welfare of the Naturals concluded []
  2. (music) A note that is not or is no longer to be modified by an accidental. [from 17th c.]
  3. (music) The symbol used to indicate such a natural note.
  4. One with an innate talent at or for something. [from 18th c.]
    He's a natural on the saxophone.
  5. An almost white colour, with tints of grey, yellow or brown; originally that of natural fabric. [from 20th c.]
    natural:  
  6. (archaic) One with a simple mind; a fool or idiot.
    Synonym: half-natural
    • c. 1591–1595 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Romeo and Ivliet”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act II, scene iv], page 62, column 1:
      Why is not this better now, then groning for Loue, now art thou ſociable, now art thou Romeo : now art thou what thou art, by Art as well as by Nature, for this driueling Loue is like a great Naturall, that runs lolling vp and downe to hid his bable in a hole.
    • 1633, A Banqvet of Jests: or, Change of Cheare. Being a collection, of Moderne Ieſts. Witty Ieeres. Pleaſant Taunts. Merry Tales. The Second Part newly publiſhed, page 30:
      A Noble-man tooke a great liking to a naturall, and had covenanted with his parents to take him from them and to keepe him for his pleaſure, and demanding of the Ideot if he would ſerve him, he made him this anſwere, My Father ſaith he, got me to be his foole of my mother, now if you long to have a foole; go & without doubt you may get one of your owne wife.
  7. (colloquial, chiefly UK) One's life.
    • 1929, Frederic Manning, The Middle Parts of Fortune, Vintage, published 2014, page 155:
      ‘Sergeant-Major Robinson came in in the middle of it, and you've never seen a man look more surprised in your natural.’
  8. (US, colloquial) A hairstyle for people with Afro-textured hair in which the hair is not straightened or otherwise treated.
    • 2002, Maxine Leeds Craig, Ain't I a Beauty Queen?: Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race, Oxford University Press, →ISBN:
      Chinosole, who stopped straightening her hair and cut it into a natural while at a predominantly white college, was quite uneasy with the style
    • 2012, Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Chicken Soup for the African American Soul: Celebrating and Sharing Our Culture One Story at a Time, Simon and Schuster, →ISBN:
      I wanted to do it for so long — throw out my chemically relaxed hair for a natural.
    • 2015, Carmen M. Cusack, HAIR AND JUSTICE: Sociolegal Significance of Hair in Criminal Justice, Constitutional Law, and Public Policy, Charles C Thomas Publisher, →ISBN, page 155:
      Third, it insinuates that black afro hairstyles (e.g., naturals) relate to African cultural heritage, which is largely untrue.
  9. (slang, chiefly in plural) A breast which has not been modified.
    • 1999 March 2, Mathew Alphonse Coppola, “Please rate these women...”, in rec.arts.movies.erotica[3] (Usenet), retrieved 2021-10-18:
      > Nina Hartley ¶ 2, unattractive, square "steriod[sic] jaw", nice ass, FAKE breasts or small naturals, great sexual presence [] > Marilyn Monroe ¶ 7, decent body, medium NATURALS, stereotypical "godess[sic]/playboy" blond/blue doesn't usually work for me, good sexual presence
    • 2002 August 19, Jon Eric, “Great Tit Debate.......”, in rec.arts.movies.erotica[4] (Usenet), retrieved 2021-10-18:
      She's [Eva/Mercedes] a brunette European with a curvy natural body with nice tits. For that matter, there are lots of women in Rocco [Siffredi]'s vids with nice naturals.
    • 2010 March 2, Miles Williams Mathis, “The Sexiest Women of the Screen: A Thinking Man's List”, in [personal website][5], archived from the original on 2010-09-23:
      It isn't the big naturals on a little torso that do it for me, since that is not my thing.
    • 2016 October 26, Stephen Falk, “The Seventh Layer”, in Wendey Stanzler, director, You're the Worst, season 3, episode 9 (television production), spoken by Vernon Barbara (Todd Robert Anderson), via FXX:
      I’m really a good person with a good heart and I believe there is someone out there who will love me. Hopefully a Mexican hottie with big naturals.
  10. (bodybuilding) Someone who has not used anabolic steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs.
    Synonym: natty
    • 2010, Gregg Valentino, Nathan Jendrick, Death, Drugs, and Muscle:
      For so long I stayed natural because it was a sense of pride to me that as a natural I was still competing and beating guys who were juicing up.
  11. (craps) A roll of two dice with a score of 7 or 11 on the comeout roll.

Translations edit

Adverb edit

natural (comparative more natural, superlative most natural)

  1. (colloquial, dialect) Naturally; in a natural manner.
    • 2002, Daniel Shields, I Know Where the Horses Play, iUniverse, page 64:
      Dr. Watson, on the other hand, spoke natural.
    • 2005, Leo Bruce, Jack on the Gallows Tree: A Carolus Deene Mystery, Chicago: Chicago Review Press, page 124:
      "If the doctor hadn't been sure she was strangled you'd have sworn she died natural."

See also edit

References edit

Asturian edit

Adjective edit

natural (epicene, plural naturales)

  1. natural

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin naturālis. First attested in the 14th century.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

natural m or f (masculine and feminine plural naturals)

  1. natural

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

natural m or f by sense (plural naturals)

  1. native, natural (person who is native to a place)
    Synonym: nadiu

Noun edit

natural m (plural naturals)

  1. nature (innate characteristics of a person)

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ natural”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2024

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese natural, borrowed from Latin naturalis.

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adjective edit

natural m or f (plural naturais)

  1. natural

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

natural m or f by sense (plural naturais)

  1. native, natural
    Synonym: nativo

Noun edit

natural m (plural naturais)

  1. nature (innate characteristics of a person)

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English natural, from Middle English natural, from Old French natural, naturel, from Latin nātūrālis, from nātus, the perfect participle of nāscor (be born, verb).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /na.ˈtu.ral/
  • Rhymes: -ral
  • Hyphenation: na‧tu‧ral

Adjective edit

natural

  1. natural
    1. of or relating to nature.
      Synonym: alamiah
    2. formed by nature; not manufactured or created by artificial processes.
      Synonyms: alamiah, asli
    3. pertaining to a decoration that preserves or enhances the appearance of the original material; not stained or artificially coloured.

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Malay edit

 
Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English natural, from Middle English natural, from Old French natural, naturel, from Latin nātūrālis, from nātus, the perfect participle of nāscor (be born, verb).

Adjective edit

natural (Jawi spellingناتورل⁩)

  1. natural
    Synonyms: alamiah, semulajadi

Noun edit

natural (Jawi spellingناتورل⁩, plural natural-natural, informal 1st possessive naturalku, 2nd possessive naturalmu, 3rd possessive naturalnya)

  1. (music) natural: the symbol ♮ used to indicate such a natural note.
    Synonym: pugar (Indonesian)
  2. nature
    Synonym: kelaziman

Further reading edit

Maltese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Italian naturale.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

natural m

  1. natural disposition

Related terms edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French natural, from Latin nātūrālis; equivalent to nature +‎ -al.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /naːˈtiu̯ral/, /naːˈtiu̯rɛl/, /naˈtiu̯ral/, /naˈtiu̯rɛl/

Adjective edit

natural

  1. intrinsic, fundamental, basic; relating to natural law.
  2. natural (preexisting; present or due to nature):
    1. usual, regular (i.e. as found in nature)
    2. well; in good heath or condition.
    3. inherited; due to one's lineage.
    4. inborn; due to one's natural reasoning (rather than a deity's intervention)
  3. Nourishing; healthful or beneficial to one's body.
  4. Misbegotten; conceived outside of marriage
  5. Correct, right, fitting.
  6. Diligent in performing one's societal obligations.
  7. (rare) Endemic, indigenous.
  8. (rare) Bodily; relating to one's human form.

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • English: natural
  • Scots: naitural

References edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin nātūrālis.

Adjective edit

natural m (oblique and nominative feminine singular naturale)

  1. natural

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin nātūrāle(m).

Adjective edit

natural m or f (plural naturaes)

  1. native (belonging to one by birth)
  2. natural, normal (as expected)
  3. (of a child) legitimate
  4. kin (related by blood)

Noun edit

natural m or f by sense (plural naturaes)

  1. native (person who is native to a place)
  2. countryman, countrywoman (somebody from one's own country)

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Piedmontese edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

natural

  1. natural

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese natural, borrowed from Latin nātūrālis.

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -al, (Brazil) -aw
  • Hyphenation: na‧tu‧ral

Adjective edit

natural m or f (plural naturais)

  1. natural
  2. native of, from
    Synonyms: originário, oriundo
    Sou natural de Lisboa.I'm from Lisbon.
  3. room-temperature (of liquids)
    Antonym: fresco
    Água naturalRoom-temperature water

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin nātūrālis, French naturel, Italian naturale. By surface analysis, natură +‎ -al.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

natural m or n (feminine singular naturală, masculine plural naturali, feminine and neuter plural naturale)

  1. natural

Declension edit

Further reading edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin nātūrālis.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /natuˈɾal/ [na.t̪uˈɾal]
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: na‧tu‧ral

Adjective edit

natural m or f (masculine and feminine plural naturales)

  1. natural (of or relating to nature)
  2. native; indigenous
  3. natural, plain (without artificial additives)
    En realidad prefiero yogur natural.
    I actually prefer plain yogurt.
  4. natural (as expected; reasonable)
    Synonym: normal
  5. Said about the lord that he has vassals, or that by his lineage, he has a right to lordship, even though he was not of the land.
  6. (of a day) being a calendar day
  7. (music) natural (neither sharp nor flat)
  8. (of a child) illegitimate (born to unmarried parents)
    Synonym: ilegítimo
    Antonym: legítimo
  9. (of a drink) room-temperature (neither heated nor chilled)
  10. (bullfighting) Said about the pass of the red flag with the left hand without the sword
  11. (Ecuador, euphemistic) native; indigenous (as called by the native Amerindians of Ecuador about themselves)
  12. (Philippines, of a child) of indigenous parentage on both parents (unlike a mestizo)

Noun edit

natural m (plural naturales)

  1. a native; a local; an indigenous person
  2. (bullfighting) the pass of the red flag with the left hand without the sword
  3. nature (genius, character, temperament, complexion, inclination of each)
  4. instinct or inclination of irrational animals
  5. (painting, sculpture) a real model that an artist reproduces in his work
  6. (obsolete) homeland; birthplace
  7. (obsolete) naturalist; physicist; astrologer (a person who studies nature or natural history)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish natural (natural).

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: na‧tu‧ral
  • IPA(key): /natuˈɾal/, [nɐ.tʊˈɾal]
  • Rhymes: -al

Adjective edit

naturál (Baybayin spelling ᜈᜆᜓᜇᜎ᜔)

  1. natural
    Synonym: likas

Related terms edit

Adverb edit

naturál (Baybayin spelling ᜈᜆᜓᜇᜎ᜔)

  1. (informal, often sarcastic) obviously; naturally
    Synonyms: likas, malamang
    Natural na hindi ka makakapasok, nakakandado yung pintuan.
    Of course, you wouldn't be able to enter, that door is locked.
    Natural!
    Obviously!

Further reading edit

  • natural”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018