plunging

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

plunging

  1. present participle of plunge

AdjectiveEdit

plunging

  1. That descends steeply.
  2. Aimed from higher ground, as fire upon an enemy.

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

plunging (plural plungings)

  1. An occurrence of putting or sinking under water or other fluid.
  2. A headlong violent motion like that of a horse trying to throw its rider.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick; or The Whale[1]:
      Like one who after a night of drunken revelry hies to his bed, still reeling, but with conscience yet pricking him, as the plungings of the Roman race-horse but so much the more strike his steel tags into him; [] .
    • 1881, Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens), The Prince and The Pauper, Complete[2]:
      Then followed a confusion of kicks, cuffs, tramplings and plungings, accompanied by a thunderous intermingling of volleyed curses, and finally a bitter apostrophe to the mule, which must have broken its spirit, for hostilities seemed to cease from that moment.

AnagramsEdit