poetaster

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from New Latin poētaster. Equivalent to poet +‎ -aster.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

poetaster (plural poetasters)

  1. An unskilled poet.
    • 1853, Henry Theodore Tuckerman, Mental Portraits; Or, Studies of Character, The Reviewer: Lord Jeffrey, page 219:
      Where the personal feelings were not engaged, it was also an agreeable pastime to follow his destructive feats; see him annihilate a poetaster, or insinuate away the pretensions of a book-wright.
    • 1913, Elijah Clarence Hills; S. Griswold Morley, editors, Modern Spanish Lyrics[1]:
      Innumerable poetasters of the early eighteenth century enjoyed fame in their day and some possessed talent; but the obscure and trivial style of the age from which they could not free themselves deprived them of any chance of enduring fame.

Related termsEdit

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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From poēt(a) (poet) +‎ -aster (expressing incomplete resemblance).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

poētaster m (genitive poētastrī); second declension

  1. (New Latin) poetaster

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative poētaster poētastrī
Genitive poētastrī poētastrōrum
Dative poētastrō poētastrīs
Accusative poētastrum poētastrōs
Ablative poētastrō poētastrīs
Vocative poētaster poētastrī

ReferencesEdit

  • poetaster in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016