pointen

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From point +‎ -en.

VerbEdit

pointen (third-person singular simple present pointens, present participle pointening, simple past and past participle pointened)

  1. (rare, transitive) To make pointy or pointed
    • 1851, Sporting Magazine, volume 18, page 419:
      Rumour was right on the other tack too; the line was a stiff one—not a mere plastered and pointened make-up, but a regular home-made rough one, with some very curious doubles—a lane that was neither good to get into or out of — and a brook about a mile from home, with very much the same kind of recommendation.
    • 1926, MededeelIngen van den Dienst der Volksgezondheid in Nederlandsch-Indië:
      Only exceptionally the teeth are pointened as is very common with the Papuas of New-Guinea.
    • 1976, Damon Knight, Orbit, page 249:
      " [] Seriously, I think we ought to say 'through genetic accident or design' to avoid the improbability of a child falling down on the sidewalk and pointening his ears."

AnagramsEdit