politesse

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the French politesse, from the Italian politezza, from polito, past participle of pulire ‎(to polish”, “to clean), from the Latin polire, present active infinite form of poliō ‎(I polish”, “I smooth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

politesse ‎(plural politesses)

  1. Civility, politeness, courtesy or gallantry; or an instance of this.
    • 1978, Iris Murdoch, The Sea, The Sea, Vintage 1999, pp. 56-7:
      The reference in his letter to ‘having a drink’ is of course just an empty politesse.
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 7:
      The soft politesse concealed a sharp observer, a gleaner of information, cool under pressure and used to having to think several steps ahead […].

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian politezza.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

politesse f ‎(plural politesses)

  1. politeness, courtesy
  2. polite remark/action

External linksEdit

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