Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin uncertain. Compare Dutch peuteren ‎(to rummage, poke), and English potter, pudder.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʌðə/, /ˈpɒðə/

NounEdit

pother ‎(plural pothers)

  1. A commotion, a tempest.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear III.ii:
      Let the great gods, / That keep this dreadful pother o’er our heads, / Find out their enemies now.
    • 1941, Lewiston Morning Tribune, 14th of May:
      (name of the article) Flight Of Hess Causes Pother Among Germans
    • 1951, C. S. Lewis, Prince Caspian, Collins, 1998, Chapter 5,
      After some years there came a time when the Queen seemed to be ill and there was a great deal of bustle and pother about her in the castle and doctors came and the courtiers whispered.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pother ‎(third-person singular simple present pothers, present participle pothering, simple past and past participle pothered)

  1. (intransitive) To make a bustle or stir; to be fussy.

AnagramsEdit

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