precoce

See also: précoce

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French précoce.

AdjectiveEdit

precoce (comparative more precoce, superlative most precoce)

  1. (obsolete) precocious

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for precoce in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

precoce (not comparable)

  1. precocious, precoce

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin praecox, praecocem.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /preˈkɔ.t͡ʃe/, /preˈko.t͡ʃe/[1]
  • Rhymes: -ɔtʃe, -otʃe
  • Hyphenation: pre‧cò‧ce, pre‧có‧ce

AdjectiveEdit

precoce (plural precoci, superlative precocissimo)

  1. premature, untimely
  2. hasty
  3. precocious, early

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ precoce in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

precoce m or f (plural precoces, comparable)

  1. precocious (characterised by exceptionally early occurrence or development)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French précoce, from Latin praecox.

AdjectiveEdit

precoce m or f or n (masculine plural precoci, feminine and neuter plural precoce)

  1. precocious

DeclensionEdit