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LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, stage, scene).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scaena f (genitive scaenae); first declension

  1. stage
  2. scene
  3. theatre
  4. natural background
  5. publicity, the public eye
  6. euphemism for death with dēcēdo

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative scaena scaenae
Genitive scaenae scaenārum
Dative scaenae scaenīs
Accusative scaenam scaenās
Ablative scaenā scaenīs
Vocative scaena scaenae

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

scaena f

  1. vocative singular of scaena

NounEdit

scaenā f

  1. ablative singular of scaena

ReferencesEdit

  • scaena in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • scaena in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • scaena in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to introduce a character on the stage: in scaenam producere aliquem
    • to come upon the stage: in scaenam prodire
    • to reappear on the stage: in scaenam redire
    • to retire from the stage: de scaena decedere
    • to bring a thing upon the stage: in scaenam aliquid inducere