sevenfold

EnglishEdit

English numbers (edit)
70
[a], [b] ←  6 7 8  → [a], [b]
    Cardinal: seven
    Ordinal: seventh
    Multiplier: septuple, sevenfold
    Distributive: septuply
    Fractional: seventh

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sevenefold, from Old English seofonfeald. Equivalent to seven +‎ -fold.

AdjectiveEdit

sevenfold (not comparable)

  1. Seven times as much; multiplied by seven.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter I, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      “I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
    • 1963 September, “French Railways' quarter-century expansion”, in Modern Railways, pages 189-190:
      Long-distance rail travel is increasing despite a similar sevenfold rise in ownership of private transport throughout the country.
  2. Having seven parts; composed of seven items.
    • 1908, Edmund Doidge Anderson Morshead (transl.), The Seven Against Thebes in Four Plays of Aeschylus, page 120.
      Come down to the sevenfold gates and harry the foemen away!

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

sevenfold (not comparable)

  1. By a factor of seven.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sevenfold

  1. Alternative form of sevenefold

AdverbEdit

sevenfold

  1. Alternative form of sevenefold