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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from an Afrikaans derivative of Dutch schrik ("shock, terror").

NounEdit

skrik (plural skriks)

  1. (South Africa) A shock; a fright.
    • 2005, Morag Vlaming, Gogo's Magic (page 89)
      I was brought up on a farm in the Free Sate a long time ago. Jong, when I first came to Johannesburg I got such a skrik.

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

skrik n (definite singular skriket, indefinite plural skrik, definite plural skrika or skrikene)

  1. cry; scream, shriek
  2. an item, usually a piece of fashion, when used in the idiomatic phrase "siste skrik" (latest fashion)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

skrik

  1. imperative of skrike

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

skrik n (definite singular skriket, indefinite plural skrik, definite plural skrika)

  1. cry; scream, shriek
  2. an item, usually a piece of fashion, when used in the idiomatic phrase "siste skrik" (latest fashion)

VerbEdit

skrik

  1. inflection of skrika:
    1. present
    2. imperative

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːk

VerbEdit

skrik

  1. imperative of skrika.

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

skrik c (no plural)

  1. startle, fright

Further readingEdit

  • skrik”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011