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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

sleek +‎ -y

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sleeky (comparative sleekier, superlative sleekiest)

  1. sleek; slick
    • 1790, Joanna Baillie, Poems, &c. (1790)[1]:
      When all is o'er, out to the door they run, With new comb'd sleeky hair, and glist'ning cheeks, Each with some little project in his head.
    • 1841, Various, Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, September 5, 1841[2]:
      He thought that the moulting season was over, and that he was rejoicing in the fulness of a sleeky plumage, and by his side was a Java sparrowess, chirping and hopping about, rendering the cage as populous to him as though he were the tenant of a bird-fancier's shop.
    • 1920, John Freeman, Poems New and Old[3]:
      Even when with heavy / Plume and pall / The sleeky coaches roll by, / Coffin, flowers and all, / He laughs, for he sees / Crouched on the coffin a small / Yellowy shape go by— / Death, uneasy and melancholy.
  2. slick; sly; untrustworthy
    • 1905, George Bernard Shaw, The Irrational Knot[4]:
      Why, I thought he was a straight-haired, sleeky, canting snake of a man.

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