Examples of 18th-century English stemware


stem +‎ -ware.



stemware ‎(usually uncountable, plural stemwares)

  1. Drinking glasses that have a stem, such as wine glasses or champagne flutes.
    • 1947, Morris H[oward] Hansen, compiler, “No. 957.—Pressed and Blown Glassware—Quantity and Value of Shipments: 1945 [table]”, in Statistical Abstract of the United States: 1947, Washington, D.C.: United States Department of Commerce, OCLC 1193890, page 861:
      Selected nonheat-resistant and nonheat-tempered tableware and kitchenware: [] Tableware: [] Machine-made tumblers, goblets and other stemware
    • 1990, Douglas V. Armstrong, “Artifacts: Reflections of Past Lifeways”, in The Old Village and the Great House: An Archaeological and Historical Examination of Drax Hall Plantation, St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica (Blacks in the New World), Urbana; Chicago, Ill.: University of Illinois Press, ISBN 978-0-252-01617-2, page 202:
      [T]he stemware and glassware fragments were recovered from a brick walkway uncovered at a depth of 60 cm, located 30 cm west of the house foundation. The stemwares could have been broken while being transported to or from the house or they could be casualties of entertaining.
    • 2013, Lisa Patton, Southern as a Second Language: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Thomas Dunne Books, ISBN 978-1-250-02065-9:
      Glancing around at the tables, I noticed they were still perfectly set the way Pierre left them: linen birds of paradise atop each plate, salt and pepper shakers, stemware and flatware, all arranged with precision.

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