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LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From subiciō (throw under or near; supply; forge; subject; propose).

NounEdit

subiectum n (genitive subiectī); second declension

  1. That which is spoken of; the foundation or subject of a proposition.
InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative subiectum subiecta
genitive subiectī subiectōrum
dative subiectō subiectīs
accusative subiectum subiecta
ablative subiectō subiectīs
vocative subiectum subiecta
DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

subiectum

  1. supine of subiciō

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of subiectus (laying under).

NounEdit

subiectum

  1. accusative singular of subiectus

Etymology 3Edit

Inflected form of subiectus (thrown under or near, adjacent; supplied; forged; subjected; proposed).

ParticipleEdit

subiectum

  1. nominative neuter singular of subiectum
  2. accusative masculine singular of subiectum
  3. accusative neuter singular of subiectum
  4. vocative neuter singular of subiectum

ReferencesEdit

  • subiectum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • subiectum” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) the town lies at the foot of a mountain: oppidum monti subiectum est
    • (ambiguous) to come within the sphere of the senses: sensibus or sub sensus subiectum esse
    • (ambiguous) to have to submit to the uncertainties of fortune; to be subject to Fortune's caprice: sub varios incertosque casus subiectum esse
    • (ambiguous) to be comprised under the term 'fear.: sub metum subiectum esse
    • (ambiguous) to be subject to some one, under some one's dominion: subiectum esse, obnoxium esse imperio or dicioni alicuius (not simply alicui)