proposition

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin prōpositiō(n-) ‎(a proposing, design, theme, case), from the verb prōpositiō.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) enPR: präp'ə-zĭshʹən IPA(key): /ˌpɹɑpəˈzɪʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃən
  • Hyphenation: prop‧o‧si‧tion

NounEdit

proposition ‎(countable and uncountable, plural propositions)

  1. (uncountable) The act of offering (an idea) for consideration.
  2. (countable) An idea or a plan offered.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.
  3. (countable, business settings) The terms of a transaction offered.
  4. (countable, US, politics) In some states, a proposed statute or constitutional amendment to be voted on by the electorate.
  5. (grammar) a complete sentence
    • The Popular Educator: a Complete Encyclopaedia of Elementary, Advanced, and Technical Education. New and Revised Edition. Volume I., p.98:
      Our English nouns remain unchanged, whether they form the subject or the object of a proposition.
  6. (countable, logic) The content of an assertion that may be taken as being true or false and is considered abstractly without reference to the linguistic sentence that constitutes the assertion.
  7. (countable, mathematics) An assertion so formulated that it can be considered true or false.
  8. (countable, mathematics) An assertion which is provably true, but not important enough to be called a theorem.
  9. A statement of religious doctrine; an article of faith; creed.
    the propositions of Wyclif and Huss
    • Jeremy Taylor
      Some persons [] change their propositions according as their temporal necessities or advantages do turn.
  10. (poetry) The part of a poem in which the author states the subject or matter of it.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

proposition ‎(third-person singular simple present propositions, present participle propositioning, simple past and past participle propositioned)

  1. (transitive, informal) To make a suggestion of sexual intercourse to (someone who one is not sexually involved with).
  2. (transitive, informal) To make an offer or suggestion to (someone).

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

proposition

  1. Genitive singular form of propositio.

FrenchEdit

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prōpositiō ‎(statement, proposition), from prōpōnō ‎(propose), from pōnō ‎(place; assume).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proposition f ‎(plural propositions)

  1. proposition, suggestion
  2. (grammar) proposition
  3. (grammar) clause

External linksEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prōpositiō, prōpositiōnem.

NounEdit

proposition f ‎(plural propositions)

  1. (Jersey) proposition
  2. (Jersey, grammar) clause

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sv

NounEdit

proposition c

  1. a proposition, a government bill[1] (draft of a law, proposed by the government)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of proposition
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative proposition propositionen propositioner propositionerna
Genitive propositions propositionens propositioners propositionernas

Usage notesEdit

  • bills introduced by members of parliament are called motion

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Government terms, Government Offices of Sweden
Read in another language