subtile

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin subtilis (fine, thin, slender, delicate), perhaps, from sub (under) + tela (a web, fabric). See tela, toil.

AdjectiveEdit

subtile (comparative subtiler, superlative subtilest)

  1. (obsolete) subtle
    • 1819, Francis Bacon, The Works of Francis Bacon, volume 2, page 2:
      And sometimes this perception, in some kind of bodies, is far more subtile than the sense; so that the sense is but a dull thing in comparison of it: we see a weather-glass will find the least difference of the weather, in heat, or cold, when men find it not.
    • 1889, Henry James, The Solution.
      I burst into mirth at this—I liked him even better when he was subtile than when he was simple.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

subtile

  1. feminine singular of subtil

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

subtile

  1. inflection of subtil:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

subtīle

  1. nominative neuter singular of subtīlis
  2. accusative neuter singular of subtīlis
  3. vocative neuter singular of subtīlis

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

subtile

  1. Alternative form of sotil

NounEdit

subtile

  1. Alternative form of sotil

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

subtile

  1. definite singular/plural of subtil

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

subtile

  1. definite singular/plural of subtil

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

subtile

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of subtil.