superfine

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From super- +‎ fine.

AdjectiveEdit

superfine (comparative more superfine, superlative most superfine)

  1. Extremely subtle or refined; extremely sensitive to slight impressions or perceptions. [from 16th c.]
    • 1695, John Locke, The Reasonableness of Christianity:
      The bulk of Mankind have not leisure for Learning and Logick, and superfine distinctions of the Schools.
  2. Extremely refined or sophisticated; very elegant. [from 16th c.]
    • 1815, Frances Burney, Journals and Letters, Penguin 2001, p. 498:
      This place, with regard to superfine visitors, fills slowly and the season is expected not only to be late, but thin, of company, from the many families that are rambling abroad.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds:
      Ask her if she would exchange her brave husband for one of those superfine niceties, who suing for favor at her feet, had at the same time lined their vows of love and constancy with the yellow dust, which had they known the strong chest to have been at their backs, while in this humble posture, it were uncertain to which might have been made an apology,—the fair lady or her dowry.
  3. Having an especially fine size or texture; made of very small particles or threads. [from 17th c.]
    Some recipes call for superfine sugar because it dissolves easier.
    • 1726, The Political state of Great Britain, page 370:
      Twelve years ago they made only course [sic] Cloth, but now they weave superfine, and fine Cloth.
  4. Of a very high or pure grade or quality. [from 17th c.]
    • 1799, The laboratory; or, School of arts, page 225:
      With respect to the matter of the medals, we must observe that, for the generality, they are made of pure gold or silver, without the allay of any other metal. Some indeed are struck on superfine copper.
    • 1932 August 26, “Combination Dinner Set / Of 121 Pieces for 27.50”, in Calgary Daily Herald:
      This set contains 97 pieces of superfine china and 24 pieces of etched Belgian glassware
  5. Very good, excellent. [from 19th c.]

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

superfine

  1. feminine singular of superfin