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See also: souper, Super, súper, süper, super-, and supèr-

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin super (above), from Pre-Italic or Proto-Indo-European *eks-uper, from *eḱs (out of) (English ex-), from *h₁eǵʰs + *uperi (English over). Cognate to hyper, from Ancient Greek.

AdjectiveEdit

super (not comparable)

  1. Of excellent quality, superfine.
  2. better than average, better than usual; wonderful.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

super (not comparable)

  1. (informal) Very; extremely (used like the prefix super-).
    The party was super awesome.

Etymology 2Edit

Short for superintendent.

NounEdit

super (plural supers)

  1. (informal, US) Abbreviation of superintendent in the sense of a building's resident manager, sometimes clarified as "building super".

Etymology 3Edit

Short for superannuation.

NounEdit

super (usually uncountable, plural supers)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, informal) Short form of superannuation, the Australian/New Zealand retirement benefits or pension scheme.
    Jane looked forward to collecting a large super payout when she retired.

Etymology 4Edit

Short for superhive.

NounEdit

super (plural supers)

  1. (beekeeping) An empty box placed above the existing boxes of the beehive in order to allow the colony to expand or store additional honey.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit

VerbEdit

super (third-person singular simple present supers, present participle supering, simple past and past participle supered)

  1. (beekeeping) To add or to place a super atop the existing boxes of the beehive.
    • 1917 Dadant, C. P., First Lessons in Beekeeping; revised & rewritten edition, 1968, by M. G. Dadant and J. C. Dadant, p 73:
      The question is: when is the best time to super?

Etymology 5Edit

Short for superhero.

NounEdit

super (plural supers)

  1. (comics, slang) superhero.

Etymology 6Edit

Short for supernumerary.

NounEdit

super (plural supers)

  1. (theater) Someone outside the normal company, but appearing on stage with no lines to speak.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, in The Affair at the Novelty Theatre[1]:
      For this scene, a large number of supers are engaged, and in order to further swell the crowd, practically all the available stage hands have to ‘walk on’ dressed in various coloured dominoes, and all wearing masks.

Etymology 7Edit

NounEdit

super (plural supers)

  1. A supercomputer.
    • 1989, Kai Hwang, ‎Doug DeGroot, Parallel processing for supercomputers and artificial intelligence
      The performances and cost ranges of three classes of commercial supercomputers are given in Table 2.1. The full-scale supers are the most expensive class, represented by Cray, ETA, and Fujitsu systems, for example.

Etymology 8Edit

Short for supernatural.

NounEdit

super (plural supers)

  1. A person who has supernatural beliefs, distinguished from a bright.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English super, French super, from Latin super.

AdjectiveEdit

super (indeclinable)

  1. (informal) super, great
    Můj brácha si koupil super auto, to musíš vidět!
    Ten výlet byl prostě super!

Usage notesEdit

This word is slightly more formal than supr, yet still informal.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

InterjectionEdit

super

  1. (informal) super

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • super in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English super.

AdverbEdit

super

  1. (informal) very

SynonymsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin super

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

super

  1. above

AntonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin super. Doublet of the inherited sur. See also hyper, borrowed from Ancient Greek.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

super (invariable)

  1. superb, great

AdverbEdit

super

  1. (informal) extremely, very (as an intensifier)
    Il est super beau
    he's very handsome
SynonymsEdit

InterjectionEdit

super

  1. great, fantastic

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

super

  1. (regional) to suck, to sip
ConjugationEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English super.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

super (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) super, great, awesome

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PrepositionEdit

super

  1. about (focused on a given topic)

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin super. Cf. sopra.

AdjectiveEdit

super (invariable)

  1. super

NounEdit

super m (invariable)

  1. The best
  2. superphosphate

super f (invariable)

  1. The best grade of petrol

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From *eks-uper, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eǵʰs (out of) (Latin ex) and *uperi (above), from *upo. The latter cognate to Ancient Greek ὑπέρ (hupér, above) and Proto-Germanic *uber (English over).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

super (+ accusative or ablative)

  1. accusative [of place] above, on the top of, upon
    Cibus super mensam est.
    The food is on the table.
  2. accusative [of place] above, beyond
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Genesis.1.2
      terra autem erat inanis et vacua et tenebrae super faciem abyssi et spiritus Dei ferebatur super aquas
      And the earth was void and empty, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God moved over the waters.
  3. accusative [of measure] above, beyond, over, in addition to

Usage notesEdit

  • With the ablative super means 'concerning'.
  • Used in many compound words, see super-.

QuotationsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • super in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • super in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • super” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the river is over its banks, is in flood: flumen super ripas effunditur
  • super in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[3], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English super.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

super (indeclinable, comparative bardziej super, superlative najbardziej super)

  1. (colloquial) great, excellent

AdverbEdit

super (comparative bardziej super, superlative najbardziej super)

  1. (colloquial) excellently

See alsoEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin super; cf. also English super. Doublet of the inherited sobre.

AdverbEdit

super (not comparable)

  1. (intensifier) very, excessively, exceedingly
    super legal - very nice

AdjectiveEdit

super (invariable, comparable)

  1. super

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin super; cf. also English super. Doublet of the inherited sobre.

AdjectiveEdit

super (invariable)

  1. (intensifier) very, mega

SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

super

  1. present tense of supa.