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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin supersessiō, from supersedeō (supersede).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

supersession (countable and uncountable, plural supersessions)

  1. The act of superseding; the fact of having been superseded.
    • 1886, Henry James, The Princess Casamassima.
      Two points became perfectly clear: one was that she was thinking of something very different from her present, her past, or her future relations with Hyacinth Robinson; the other was that he was superseded indeed. This was so completely the case that it did not even occur to her, it was evident, that the sense of supersession might be cruel to the young man.
    • 1897, Henry James, What Maisie Knew:
      Still excessively abundant, it was dressed in a manner of which the poor lady appeared not yet to have recognised the supersession, with a glossy braid, like a large diadem, on the top of the head [...].

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