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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French superseder (postpone, defer), from Latin supersedere, from super (over) + sedere (to sit). The meaning “to replace” is from 1642, probably by association with unrelated precede – note that ‘c’ instead of ‘s’ (from cedere (to yield), not sedere (to sit)). As a result, supercede is a common misspelling – see therein for further discussion. Doublet of surcease.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

supersede (third-person singular simple present supersedes, present participle superseding, simple past and past participle superseded)

  1. (transitive) To take the place of.
    Those older products have been superseded by our new range.
  2. (transitive) To displace in favour of itself.
    Modern US culture has superseded the native forms.

Usage notesEdit

Supersede is the only English word ending in -sede. Similar words include four ending in -ceed, and several ending in cede. Because of this, supercede is a common misspelling of this word.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

supersede (plural supersedes)

  1. (Internet) An updated newsgroup post that supersedes an earlier version.
    Rogue cancels and supersedes are being issued on a large scale against posters.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ supersede” in TheFreeDictionary.com, Huntingdon Valley, Pa.: Farlex, Inc., 2003–2019.

LatinEdit