supplementum

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From suppleō (fill up; complete; supply) +‎ -mentum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

supplēmentum n (genitive supplēmentī); second declension

  1. something that fills up or makes up the numbers; supplement
    1. (military) reinforcements
      • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 26.1:
        Si supplemento opus esset, suppleret de legionibus quibus P. Cornelius pro praetore in Sicilia praeesset, []
        If reinforcements were needed, he should supply them with the legions which Publius Cornelius, propraetor, was in charge of in Sicily, []
    2. supplies

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative supplēmentum supplēmenta
Genitive supplēmentī supplēmentōrum
Dative supplēmentō supplēmentīs
Accusative supplēmentum supplēmenta
Ablative supplēmentō supplēmentīs
Vocative supplēmentum supplēmenta

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • supplementum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • supplementum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • supplementum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • supplementum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to levy recruits to fill up the strength: supplementum cogere, scribere, legere