EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French talion, from Latin talis (such).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

talion (uncountable)

  1. Retaliation; retribution.
    • 1973, Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow:
      Simple talion may be fine for wartime, but politics between wars demands symmetry and a more elegant idea of justice, even to the point of masquerading, a bit decadently, as mercy.

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

talion

  1. accusative singular of talio

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French talion, from Latin talio, from talis (such).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

talion m (uncountable)

  1. retaliation
  2. (law) a punishment equal to the injury sustained

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

First known attestation in 1395[1], borrowed from Latin tāliō.

NounEdit

talion f (plural talions)

  1. punishment consisting of the offender having done to him or her what he or she has done to the victim

DescendantsEdit

  • English: talion
  • French: talion

ReferencesEdit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (talion, supplement)
  1. ^ talion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French talion.

NounEdit

talion n (uncountable)

  1. talion, retaliation

DeclensionEdit