See also: tincá

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin tinca.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtin.ka/
  • Rhymes: -inka
  • Hyphenation: tìn‧ca

NounEdit

tinca f (plural tinche)

  1. tench

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably of Celtic/Gaulish origin, from Proto-Indo-European *teh₂- (to dissolve, melt).[1][2] The fish was thought to be poisonous.

NounEdit

tinca f (genitive tincae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin) a small fish, the tench

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tinca tincae
Genitive tincae tincārum
Dative tincae tincīs
Accusative tincam tincās
Ablative tincā tincīs
Vocative tinca tincae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • tinca”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tinca in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • tinca in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  1. ^ tench”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016, →ISBN.
  2. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

tinca

  1. inflection of tincar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative