triple entendre

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Based on double entendre.

NounEdit

triple entendre (plural triple entendres)

  1. (humorous) A phrase that has three meanings.
    • 1998 July 1, Christopher M. Stangl, “"Snail Shell" interp: Quetzacoatl's Cock Tease”, in alt.music.tmbg, Usenet[1], retrieved 2022-06-05:
      In a triple entendre of the highest order, Linnell summarizes the song.
    • 2003 May 21, Zevra and his little green guy, “The secret to being funny”, in alt.humor, Usenet[2], retrieved 2022-06-05:
      Actually, that a triple entendre! And speaking of triple entendres ...
    • 2004 July 28, naismith, “An Open Letter To Leesa”, in alt.religion.wicca, Usenet[3], retrieved 2022-06-05:
      A triple-entendre, if you will; 'purloined', as in out in the open and a way to change the subject title without losing the thread. The third part of the entendre was that anything is new if perspective can be shifted.
    • 2005 April 17, R. Stewart, “Clipse are good rappers, discuss”, in rec.music.hip-hop, Usenet[4], retrieved 2022-06-05:
      Pretty much agree with you and Pete on this one... that and the fact that every few months, a few of my friends and I get into a discussion of whether or not one of the verses from 'Grindin' constitutes a proper triple entendre...
      "Them days I wasn't able/Abel, there was always cane/'caine/Kane"
      ...good stuff to anger and annoy any literary types you know...
    • 2014 August 30, Siri Crews, “Think Like a Rock”, in alt.atheism, Usenet[5], retrieved 2022-06-05:
      'Tout de suite' is a french phrase meaning in a hurry and pronounced the same as the english 'toot sweet'. Hence it bilingual triple entendre.

Related termsEdit