turbant

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

turbant (plural turbants)

  1. Obsolete form of turban.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Howell to this entry?)
    • 1671, John Milton, Paradise Regained, Book IV, lines 69 to 79.
      [] Some from furthest south, / Syene, and where the shadow both way falls, / Meroë, Nilotic isle; and, more to west, / The realm of Bocchus to the Black-moor sea; / From the Asian kings, and Parthian among these; / From India and the Golden Chersonese, / And utmost Indian isle Taprobanè, / Dusk faces with white silken turbants wreathed; / From Gallia, Gades, and the British west, / Germans, and Scythians, and Sarmatians north, / Beyond Danubius to the Tauric pool.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for turbant in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French turbant or from Italian turbante, both ultimately from from Persian دلبند(dolband).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

turbant m (plural turbants)

  1. turban

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

turbant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of turbō