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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

unfit +‎ -ly

AdverbEdit

unfitly (comparative more unfitly, superlative most unfitly)

  1. In an unfit manner; unsuitably, inappropriately, not fitly.
    • 1690, John Locke, An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume II.[1]:
      These two sorts of essences, I suppose, may not unfitly be termed, the one the REAL, the other NOMINAL ESSENCE. 16.
    • 1872, H. N. Hudson, Shakespeare= His Life, Art, And Characters, Volume I.[2]:
      And in reference to this harmonious interplay of all the human faculties and sensibilities, I may not unfitly apply to Shakespeare's workmanship these choice lines from Wordsworth: "Brisk Youth appeared, the Morn of youth, With freaks of graceful folly,-- Life's temperate Noon, her sober Eve, Her Night not melancholy; Past, present, future, all appeared, In harmony united, Like guests that meet, and some from far, By cordial love invited."
    • 1921, Harry Leon Wilson, The Wrong Twin[3]:
      He had said he would, but had dawdled skillfully and was still unfitly in bare feet and the shabby garments of a weekday.