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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

un- +‎ logic

NounEdit

unlogic (uncountable)

  1. Want or absence of logic; illogic
    • Thomas Carlyle
      The most Conservative English People, thickest-skinned, most patient of Peoples, is driven alike by its Logic and its Unlogic, by things 'spoken,' and by things not yet spoken or very speakable, but only felt []
    • 1985, Ernst Lehrs, Man Or Matter - Page 358:
      We are here confronted with an 'unlogic' characteristic of human thinking during its state of isolation from the dynamic substratum of the world of the senses, an unlogic which one encounters repeatedly in scientific argumentation once one has grown aware of it.
    • 1996, Friedrich Nietzsche, ‎R. J. Hollingdale, Nietzsche: Human, All Too Human:
      Almost all the problems of philosophy once again pose the same form of question as they did two thousand years ago: how can something originate in its opposite, for example rationality in irrationality, the sentient in the dead, logic in unlogic, disinterested contemplation in covetous desire, living for others in egoism, truth in error?
    • 2011, Philipp Kirchner, Heurists and Biases with Habitual Entrepreneurs - Page 26:
      Moreover, the regular use of logic would make subjects predictable, thus unlogic decision behavior might be more adaptive in specific situation.
    • 2014, Andre Norton, Wizard's Worlds: A Short Story Collection:
      Logic, even in such a world of unlogic, must make her think lucidly.

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