English

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Etymology

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un- +‎ quenchable

Adjective

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unquenchable (comparative more unquenchable, superlative most unquenchable)

  1. That cannot be quenched.
    After a twelve-mile run in the hot sun, his thirst felt unquenchable.
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Francesca Carrara. [], volume I, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), →OCLC, pages 3–4:
      Alas! thus ever does the weakness of our nature rebuke its strength, and genius is brought to the level—ay, below the level—of common humanity, by an unquenchable thirst for its applause.
    • 1946 March and April, R. A. H. Weight, “Euston to the North-West”, in Railway Magazine, page 69:
      With an unquenchable enthusiasm for locomotives and their work, at an early age I had commenced to keep engine and traffic-recording notebooks, compiled in a schoolboy's round hand.

Translations

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