weekday

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English weke-day, wykday, wok day, woke day, wockeday, wouke day, wukedaȝȝ, equivalent to week +‎ day. Compare West Frisian wikedei (weekday), Dutch weekdag (weekday), German Wochentag (weekday), Danish ugedag (weekday), Swedish veckodag (weekday), Norwegian ukedag (weekday).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈwiːkdeɪ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

weekday (plural weekdays)

  1. Any individual day of the week, except those which form the weekend or the single weekly day off; that is:
    1. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday or Friday, but not Saturday or Sunday.
      • 2019 October, Tony Miles and Philip Sherratt, “EMR kicks off new era”, in Modern Railways, page 58:
        The Nottingham to Skegness route and Robin Hood line from Nottingham to Mansfield and Worksop will continue with their current weekday patterns; linked to the latter is EMR's commitment to carry out a feasibility study into operating Robin Hood trains to Ollerton.
    2. (Islam) Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, but not Friday.
    3. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, but not Sunday. (e.g. in Vietnam)
    4. (Judaism) Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday or Friday, but not Saturday.
  2. (now rare) Any day of the week (Monday through Sunday).

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