TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

day

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-5 language code for Land Dayak languages.

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English day, from Old English dæġ (day), from Proto-West Germanic *dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz (day), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰogʷʰ-o-s, from *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian Dai (day), West Frisian dei (day), Dutch dag (day), German Low German Dag (day), Alemannic German Däi (day), German Tag (day), Swedish, Norwegian and Danish dag (day), Icelandic dagur (day), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌲𐍃 (dags, dags). Cognate also with Albanian djeg (to burn), Lithuanian degti (to burn), Tocharian A tsäk-, Russian жечь (žečʹ, to burn) from *degti, дёготь (djógotʹ, tar, pitch), Sanskrit दाह (dāhá, heat), दहति (dáhati, to burn), Latin foveō (to warm, keep warm, incubate).

Latin diēs is a false cognate; it derives from Proto-Indo-European *dyew- (to shine).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

day (plural days)

  1. Any period of 24 hours.
    I've been here for two days and a bit.
  2. A period from midnight to the following midnight.
    The day begins at midnight.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:day
  3. (astronomy) Rotational period of a planet (especially Earth).
    A day on Mars is slightly over 24 hours.
  4. The part of a day period which one spends at one’s job, school, etc.
    I worked two days last week.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      [] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. []
  5. Part of a day period between sunrise and sunset where one enjoys daylight; daytime.
    day and night;  I work at night and sleep during the day.
    Synonyms: daylight, upsun; see also Thesaurus:daytime
    Antonyms: night; see also Thesaurus:nighttime
  6. A specified time or period; time, considered with reference to the existence or prominence of a person or thing; age; time.
    Every dog has its day.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314:
      This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. [] Indeed, all his features were in large mold, like the man himself, as though he had come from a day when skin garments made the proper garb of men.
    • 1945 August 17, George Orwell [pseudonym; Eric Arthur Blair], chapter 6, in Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, London: Secker & Warburg, OCLC 3655473:
      If they had no more food than they had had in Jones's day, at least they did not have less.
    • 2011, Kat Martin, A Song for My Mother[200], Vanguard Press, →ISBN:
      In his senior year, he had run across an old '66 Chevy Super Sport headed for the junkyard, bought it for a song, and overhauled it with his dad's help, turning it into the big red muscle car it was back in its day.
    Synonyms: era, epoch; see also Thesaurus:era
  7. A period of contention of a day or less.
    The day belonged to the Allies.
  8. (meteorology) A 24-hour period beginning at 6am or sunrise.
    Your 8am forecast: The high for the day will be 30 and the low, before dawn, will be 10.

HypernymsEdit

Hypernyms of day

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Sranan Tongo: dei

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

VerbEdit

day (third-person singular simple present days, present participle daying, simple past and past participle dayed)

  1. (rare, intransitive) To spend a day (in a place).
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, chapter XXIII, in The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, volume I, The Burton Club, page 233:
      I nighted and dayed in Damascus town[.]

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Common Turkic *dāy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

day (definite accusative dayı, plural daylar)

  1. colt, foal

DeclensionEdit

    Declension of day
singular plural
nominative day
daylar
definite accusative dayı
dayları
dative daya
daylara
locative dayda
daylarda
ablative daydan
daylardan
definite genitive dayın
dayların
    Possessive forms of day
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) dayım daylarım
sənin (your) dayın dayların
onun (his/her/its) dayı dayları
bizim (our) dayımız daylarımız
sizin (your) dayınız daylarınız
onların (their) dayı or dayları dayları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) dayımı daylarımı
sənin (your) dayını daylarını
onun (his/her/its) dayını daylarını
bizim (our) dayımızı daylarımızı
sizin (your) dayınızı daylarınızı
onların (their) dayını or daylarını daylarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) dayıma daylarıma
sənin (your) dayına daylarına
onun (his/her/its) dayına daylarına
bizim (our) dayımıza daylarımıza
sizin (your) dayınıza daylarınıza
onların (their) dayına or daylarına daylarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) dayımda daylarımda
sənin (your) dayında daylarında
onun (his/her/its) dayında daylarında
bizim (our) dayımızda daylarımızda
sizin (your) dayınızda daylarınızda
onların (their) dayında or daylarında daylarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) dayımdan daylarımdan
sənin (your) dayından daylarından
onun (his/her/its) dayından daylarından
bizim (our) dayımızdan daylarımızdan
sizin (your) dayınızdan daylarınızdan
onların (their) dayından or daylarından daylarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) dayımın daylarımın
sənin (your) dayının daylarının
onun (his/her/its) dayının daylarının
bizim (our) dayımızın daylarımızın
sizin (your) dayınızın daylarınızın
onların (their) dayının or daylarının daylarının

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Lezgi: тай (taj) (or < Kumyk)

ReferencesEdit

  • Clauson, Gerard (1972), “ta:y”, in An Etymological Dictionary of pre-thirteenth-century Turkish, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Further readingEdit

  • day” in Obastan.com.

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Initial clipping of inday.

PronunciationEdit

  • (General Cebuano) IPA(key): /ˈd̪aɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Hyphenation: day

NounEdit

day

  1. (colloquial) A familiar address to a girl.
  2. A familiar address to a daughter.

KalashaEdit

VerbEdit

day

  1. I am

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English dæġ, from Proto-West Germanic *dag.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

day (plural dayes or days or dawes)

  1. day (composed of 24 hours)
  2. day (as opposed to night)
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Genesis 1:5”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      and he clepide the liȝt, dai, and the derkneſſis, nyȝt. And the euentid and morwetid was maad, o daie.
      And he called light "day" and the darkness "night". And the evening and morning was made; one day.
  3. daylight, sunlight
  4. epoch, age, period
  5. A certain day.
AntonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

day

  1. Alternative form of þei (they)

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English day

NounEdit

day (plural days)

  1. day
  2. (in the definite singular) today
    A'm sorry, A've no seen Angus the day.
    I'm sorry, I haven't seen Angus today.

TagalogEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /dai/, [daɪ̯]

NounEdit

day

  1. Alternative spelling of 'day