AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

weke

  1. plural of week

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːkə

AdjectiveEdit

weke

  1. Inflected form of week

VerbEdit

weke

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of wijken

VerbEdit

weke

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of weken

AnagramsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *wika, from Proto-West Germanic *wikā.

NounEdit

wēke f

  1. week

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: week
    • Afrikaans: week
    • Berbice Creole Dutch: weki
    • Jersey Dutch: wêk
    • Negerhollands: week
    • Arawak: wiki
    • ? Sranan Tongo: wiki
  • Limburgish: waek

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English wiċe, wucu; from Proto-West Germanic *wikā, from Proto-Germanic *wikǭ.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (mainly Early ME) IPA(key): /ˈwik(ə)/, /ˈwuk(ə)/
  • IPA(key): /ˈweːk(ə)/, /ˈwoːk(ə)/

NounEdit

weke (plural wekes or weken)

  1. week (a duration of seven days from Sunday to Saturday; a calendar week)
  2. week (any duration of (around) seven days)
  3. (six-day) workweek (a duration of six days from Monday to Saturday)
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English wēoce[1], from Proto-West Germanic *weukā (flax bundle, wick), from Proto-Indo-European *weg- (to weave),[2] see also West Frisian wjok, wjuk (wing), Dutch wiek (wing; propeller, blade; wick), German Wieche (wisp; wick).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈweːk(ə)/, /ˈwik(ə)/

NounEdit

weke

  1. A candlewick or wick.
  2. The cord or rope used to create wicks; wicking.
  3. Wicking used in medical contexts (e.g. as a bandage).
  4. A kind of low-quality textile.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit
  1. ^ wẹ̄̆k(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-11.
  2. ^ Guus Kroonen, The Proto-Germanic n-stems: A study in diachronic morphophonology (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2011), 160–1.

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Old Norse vǫkva (moisture), from vǫkr (wet).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

weke

  1. (rare) wetness
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 4Edit

AdjectiveEdit

weke

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of quyk

Etymology 5Edit

AdjectiveEdit

weke

  1. Alternative form of weyk