See also: Wik

ChoctawEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English week

NounEdit

wīk (alienable)

  1. week

ChuukeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English week.

NounEdit

wik

  1. week

IwamEdit

NounEdit

wik

  1. woman

ReferencesEdit

  • transnewguinea.org, citing D. C. Laycock, Languages of the Lumi Subdistrict (West Sepik District), New Guinea (1968), Oceanic Linguistics, 7 (1): 36-66

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English wicce.

AdjectiveEdit

wik

  1. Alternative form of wikke

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English wēoce.

NounEdit

wik

  1. Alternative form of weke (wick)

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīcus, from Proto-Indo-European *weyḱ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wīk f

  1. settlement, village, dwelling

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: wîk

Tok PisinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English week.

NounEdit

wik

  1. week
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Jenesis 2:3:
      Na God i tambuim de namba 7 na em i tok olsem de namba 7 bilong olgeta wik em i bikpela de bilong em yet, long wanem, em i wokim pinis olgeta samting na long dispela de em i malolo.
      →New International Version translation

Etymology 2Edit

From English wick.

NounEdit

wik

  1. wick

Etymology 3Edit

From English weak.

AdjectiveEdit

wik

  1. weak
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

WadjiginyEdit

NounEdit

wik

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Darrell T. Tryon, An introduction to Maranungku (Northern Australia) (1970) (quoted online in ASJP)