See also: weþe

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

weye (third-person singular simple present weyes, present participle weying, simple past and past participle weyed)

  1. Obsolete form of weigh.

Etymology 2Edit

See way.

NounEdit

weye (plural weyes)

  1. Obsolete form of way.

AjiëEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

weye

  1. road, path

ReferencesEdit


MapudungunEdit

NounEdit

weye (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. a male-bodied individual who fulfils a third gender role in Mapudungun society often as a shaman or a machi; sometimes used to refer to effeminate men or simply homosexual men.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Old English wǣgan (to delude”, “to deceive).

VerbEdit

weye (third-person singular simple present weyeþ, past participle yweid)

  1. Deceive; lead astray.
  2. Go astray.

ReferencesEdit

  • † Weye” listed on page 334 of volume X, part II (V–Z) of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles [1st ed., 1928]
      † Weye, v.Obs. rare. Also waye. [OE. wǽᵹan to delude, deceive.] [¶] 1. trans. To deceive, lead astray. [¶] c 1315 Shoreham Poems i. 370 Þat he ne may nauȝt yweid be Wiþ blanding ne wiþ boste. Ibid. vii. 648 The deuel..dorste nauȝt adam asaylly, Al for to waye. [¶] 2. intr. To go astray. [¶] c 1315 Shoreham Poems i. 301 Bote hi ariȝt icristned be, Fram heuene euere hi weyeþ.
  • †weye, v.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd ed., 1989]