EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English astraien or by apheresis straien, from Old French estraier (to stray), from late Medieval Latin extravagari (to wander beyond), from Latin extra (beyond) + vagārī (to wander, stray).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /əˈstɹeɪ/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

AdverbEdit

astray

  1. In a wrong or unknown and wrongly-motivated direction.
    • 1907, Virgil, “1.X”, in Edward Fairfax Taylor, transl., The Æneid of Virgil[1], London: J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.:
      Go, set the storm-winds free, / And sink their ships or scatter them astray, / And strew their corpses forth, to weltering waves a prey.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ astray in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

AnagramsEdit