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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English wondrous, metathetic variation of Middle English wonders (wondrous, wonderful, adjective), from Old English wundres (of wonder), genitive singular of wundor (wonder, miracle), from Proto-Germanic *wundrą (wonder). Compare Dutch wonders, German Wunder.

AdjectiveEdit

wondrous (comparative more wondrous, superlative most wondrous)

  1. Wonderful; amazing, inspiring awe; marvelous.
    We all stared open-mouthed at the wondrous sight.
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act II, Scene ii[1]:
      I'll show thee the best springs; I'll pluck thee berries;
      I'll fish for thee, and get thee wood enough.
      A plague upon the tyrant that I serve!
      I'll bear him no more sticks, but follow thee,
      Thou wondrous man.

Derived TermsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

wondrous (comparative more wondrous, superlative most wondrous)

  1. In a wonderful degree; remarkably; wondrously.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Spenser
      And looking up he waxed wondrous woe.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene viii[2]:
      [] And even there, his eye being big with tears,
      Turning his face, he put his hand behind him,
      And with affection wondrous sensible
      He [Antonio] wrung Bassanio's hand; and so they parted.
    • XIX century, Emily Dickinson, As by the dead we love to sit:
      As by the dead we love to sit, / Become so wondrous dear — / As for the lost we grapple / Tho' all the rest are here []

TranslationsEdit