wonderful

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old English wundorful ‎(wonderful), equivalent to wonder +‎ -ful. Cognate Dutch wondervol ‎(wonderful), German wundervoll ‎(wonderful).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wonderful ‎(comparative wonderfuller or wonderfuler or more wonderful, superlative wonderfullest or wonderfulest or most wonderful)

  1. (now rare) Tending to excite wonder; surprising, extraordinary.
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, p. 278:
      He is massively corrupt. It is wonderful how the man's popularity survives.
  2. Surprisingly excellent; very good or admirable, extremely impressive.
    They served a wonderful six-course meal.
    • 2012 April 29, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Treehouse of Horror III” (season 4, episode 5; originally aired 10/29/1992)”[1]:
      Though they obviously realized that these episodes were part of something wonderful and important and lasting, the writers and producers couldn’t have imagined that 20 years later “Treehouse Of Horror” wouldn’t just survive; it’d thrive as one of the most talked-about and watched episodes of every season of The Simpsons.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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Related termsEdit

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923: official · loss · spot · #942: wonderful · shook · fit · distribute

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