EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin xenium.

NounEdit

xenium (plural xenia)

  1. A gift or offering.
    • 1872, Mackenzie Edward C. Walcott, Traditions and customs of cathedrals (page 136)
      At Rochester the Bishop received a xenium or pension on St. Andrew's Day from the convent.
    1. (historical, Ancient Greece, Rome) A gift given to guests or foreign ambassadors, often of food.

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ξένιον (xénion)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

xenium n (genitive xeniī or xenī); second declension

  1. a present, gift, especially one for a host or vice-versa.

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative xenium xenia
Genitive xeniī
xenī1
xeniōrum
Dative xeniō xeniīs
Accusative xenium xenia
Ablative xeniō xeniīs
Vocative xenium xenia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit